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Creator & Artist Stories

Atila Iamarino walks us through his extraordinary YouTube career

  • By The YouTube Team
  • Mar.15.2021
Atila Iamarino walks us through his extraordinary YouTube career
In 2020, Atila added 1,300,833 subscribers to his eponymous channel by hosting live streams about the microbiological aspect of the pandemic and making science and tech explainer videos.

When the coronavirus first started spreading in Asia, people in Brazil rightfully worried and wanted to understand what was going on. So Atila Iamarino, a PhD biologist with a post-doc in virology, began making videos in January 2020 to try to help explain the latest information from health authorities and scientific researches. 


As his channel grew and the trusted biologist found his groove, we asked Atila -- a creator of many talents and a long string of degrees -- to take a look at his past videos and YouTube career. Though we only had room to list the top 10 breakout creators in 2020 in the Culture & Trends report, we also wanted to highlight creators, such as Atila, who had their own standout year.


We wanted to know: How did he do it all?


In 2012


Atila got a PhD in microbiology from the University of São Paolo. 



In 2013


He starts his YouTube channel, “Nerdologia,” to get people to “know, understand and like science.”


Meanwhile, he’s pursuing his post-doc, too.



In 2015


Atila concludes his post-doc and begins dedicating himself, exclusively, to scientific dissemination through Nerdologia.


YouTube showed me how much people want to learn and understand what’s happening, and educate themselves.”


In 2020



Atila added 1,300,833 subscribers to his eponymous channel by hosting live streams about the microbiological aspect of the pandemic and making science and tech explainer videos.


“YouTube showed me how much people want to learn and understand what’s happening, and educate themselves. … What I find most exciting is how to use the audience we grew, how to use the respect I’ve got to bring more science to people and more education to them. It’s really necessary here.”